Skip to content

All posts by Holy Spirit Catholic Church

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Cycle B

September 16, 2018

Fr. Joseph Jacobi


Listen



Over the last several weeks we“Whoever wishes to save his life loses it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and the sake of the gospel will save it.” (Mark 8:35) This is what St. John Paul II called the “law of the gift.” Pope John Paul II stated it this way: “Man can only find himself through the sincere gift of self.” This teaching of the 2 nd Vatican Council, repeated incessantly by St. John Paul II, unmasks the deception of a life focused on self. If I seek only to preserve myself—my interests, my comforts, my preferences— I lose everything. But, if I learn to sacrifice myself, if I learn how to be a gift to and for others, I not only bless and affirm the God-given dignity of others, I find myself and “save” my life in the process.

The “law of the gift” helps us better understand the mystery of the cross and what it means for us to carry the cross. Instead of focusing solely on ourselves, we deny ourselves and follow Jesus, who is the example of what self-giving love looks like. We participate in carrying HIS cross, not just any old cross. For the cross is simply an instrument of torture that was used not only to kill Jesus but other condemned criminals. BUT Jesus’ cross is different for on it he gives himself completely to the Father out of love and for us out of love. The innocent One dying for the guilty, the Son of God for the sons and daughters of men, emptying his life that we might share in divine life and death destroyed.

So, to carry the cross does not mean suffering through illness, because that is self-focused. Besides, everyone at one time or another suffers from sickness, whether they are Christian or not. Instead, to carry the cross means to help others in their time of illness, to be the healing hands of Christ to them.

To deny oneself and follow Jesus in carrying the cross does not mean when disaster strikes my life, this is my cross to carry. Every human being faces and deals with disaster at one time or another in their life. Instead, to carry the cross means reaching out to help carry people who are impacted by disasters in their life. Just as well, to carry the cross does not mean struggling through the burden of sorrow over the death of a loved one. Once again, that is self-focused, not other-directed. To carry the cross instead means to lift up others who are being crushed by the weight of their sorrow, to dry the tears of those who weep, to bring them the hope of new life by our self-giving love.

What you are willing to give up for someone reveals your love for them more than words can ever say. Real love and sacrifice are never far apart. Love which is the real deal is always connected to the gift of self. In fact, it’s not what we take and have which makes us rich, but rather what we give up. St. James in his letter proclaims the same truth in a different way by stating that faith without works is dead. True faith is faith put into practice. Real faith acts on behalf of others, especially those in greatest need. Faith Works! Today we are given an opportunity to put our faith to work, to love in a sacrificial way, by responding generously to the annual Catholic Charities Appeal. Our sisters and brothers who need our help will receive it through the many excellent service programs of Catholic Charities. I invite forward Molly Bernard to speak with us about the good works Catholic Charities does in our name and with our sacrificial support.


Reflection for the 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

[He] said to him, “Ephphatha!” (that is, “Be opened!”)

And [immediately] the man’s ears were opened, his speech impediment was removed, and he spoke plainly.

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time – Cycle

September 2, 2018

Fr. Joseph A. Jacobi


Listen



We have finished our Scripture summer vacation through Chapter 6 of John’s Gospel and now return to the Gospel of Mark, the Gospel for this liturgical year. We spent the last 5 Sundays coming to know more fully Jesus as the Bread of Life who gives his flesh for the life of the world, who hungers for union with us, that we might live and love with Him and in Him. As we are drawn deeper into this intimate union with the Word of God made Flesh, we recognize more fully with Peter that he alone has the words of everlasting life. That Jesus is the Word of everlasting life.

Today in Mark’s Gospel the words Jesus speaks to the Pharisees & scribes help us to see more clearly the danger of hypocrisy and the importance of integrity in our life of faith. Some of the Pharisees and scribes focus only on the externals of religion, following the rules. They neglect the heart of religion, the most important law of God to love God by loving one’s neighbors. (Remember in the Parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus puts no limit on who one’s neighbor is.) Jesus looks into the heart, while they focus only on external appearances.

Jesus hangs out with those whom the religious hypocrites of the day consider to be sinners, whom they would never get close to for fear of being contaminated and becoming unclean.

These “religious” ones believe that someone like a deaf mute is a sinner, thinking that such a person has done something terribly wrong to be punished by God with such a serious disability. However, Jesus sees those who struggle with disabilities and sickness as revealing the glory of God and knows they trust in God’s care more than the healthy do.

The Pharisees see a tax collector as a traitor, working with the Roman occupiers and making money off his own Jewish brothers and sisters, whereas Jesus looks into the heart of Matthew the tax collector and sees an apostle.

The religious leaders see a prostitute and label her a sinner while Jesus gets to know these women as warriors who do whatever is necessary to provide for their starving children. The Pharisees and scribes believe those who are rich are blessed by God, and conversely that those who are poor must be cursed by God. But by caring for the impoverished, Jesus shows that the poor are God’s favorites.

Judgment spews from the Pharisees and scribes—they judge others on the externals. Mercy flows from Jesus, because he sees into the heart, and as Savior has come to save those who need him. Such Pharisees and scribes never even attempt to know those they consider sinners, because these “pious” ones stand at a distance judging, while Jesus dines with sinners, feeding them with the gift of God’s saving mercy.

The Pharisee in each one of us is convinced that by keeping the rules we can earn our salvation. The Pharasaical temptation is to think we can save ourselves by focusing only on externals, by perfect observance of the rules.

This kind of thinking leaves Jesus out of the picture. There is no purpose and no reason for a Savior in this kind of system. In his debate in today’s Gospel with the Pharisees, Jesus takes a stand against this kind of thinking. Salvation is from the hand of God made visible in Christ. It is a free gift, not something we can earn and then think we can deserve. Jesus is the perfect gift come from God the Father who saves us from ourselves. For we all fall into the trap, in one way or another, of thinking we can earn our salvation.

The danger with this kind of thinking is that it leads to judging others as unclean, as unworthy, as outside of God’s care. If we think we can earn salvation by earning the approval of God, then we think we deserve it by what we do, and thus those who do not do the same are condemned. When we focus only on the externals, it is easy to be both jury and judge in our relations with others and consider them to be outside of God’s care and thus outside of ours as well.

Jesus’ message—pay attention to yourself. Pay attention to what resides in your own heart. For from within the heart arise thoughts which make one unclean, which defile a person. The Savior of the World, the one who is the Word of Life, waits on us to invite him into a deep-sea dive into the depths of our heart. With him we can plunge into the darkest recesses of our heart and ask him to save us from whatever death-dealing attitudes reside there.

On Judgment Day I think we will be asked by God not whether we perfectly followed the “rules” but whether we loved our neighbor and thus demonstrated our love for God.

According to St. James, one of the 12 apostles who learned at the feet of Jesus, religion which is pure and undefiled before God is this : “to care for orphans and widows in their affliction.” (James 1: 27) That’s right—loving the most vulnerable in our world, reaching out to lift them up in their time of struggle and suffering—this is what real religion looks like.

This is what it means to love the Son of God, who became poor that we might become rich in God’s mercy.

As we journey through these Sundays of September, we will keep returning to the Letter of James and his challenging teaching on what real religion looks like.

The word of God in this letter will lay bare the temptation of our hearts to judge others on appearances. James will point out that even in an assembly of Christians gathering for worship, this deadly dynamic continues to play out, as we welcome the well dressed person and shun the poor person in shabby clothes. Think about it— how would you react if a homeless person came in here looking for a seat?

Or Christians only offer prayers of blessing for those who have nothing to wear or no food to eat, instead of clothing and feeding them in their need.

A living faith, as James points out, leads to good works, for we are to be doers of the word and not hearers only. If we want the living Word of God to take root in our hearts and dispel the darkness living there, then we are called to love him present in the least of our brothers and sisters.


21st Sunday in Ordinary Time – Cycle B

August 26, 2018

Deacon Bill Hough


Listen



Over the last several weeks we have been reading the sixth chapter of John which began with the feeding of the five thousand, followed by Jesus’ Bread of Life Discourse. In this chapter, Jesus tells us in order have eternal life with Him, we must eat His flesh and drink His blood.

Today we come the end of this chapter and His disciples must to choose to believe and follow Him or choose to walk away. Many do choose to return to their former way of life. But then we hear one of Peter’s great professions of faith, “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced you are the Holy One of God”.

Throughout these weeks, Father Jacobi has stressed that if we truly believe in these words of Jesus which He emphasized at the Last Supper, “This is my body, this is my blood” then we will come to Church each Sunday with an attitude of thanksgiving and reverence.

As Catholics, we believe that by these words of institution spoken by the priest, the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ – we call this transubstantiation. Not all Christians believe this – some believe in consubstantiation – that Jesus is present in some way for a short period of time. Others only see communion as a symbol. However, Jesus Himself told us that this truly becomes His Body and Blood and that we need this Body and Blood to have life within us.

I encourage you to really listen to the words that are spoken today – not just the readings, but the whole Mass. Justin Martyr, one of the Fathers of the Church who lived in the second century wrote about the worship service of the early Church. He describes the breaking of the bread and the epiclesis where the Holy Spirit is asked to come down during the consecration of the bread and wine. He talks about praying the psalms and reading from Scripture followed by exhortation – the homily.

Whenever I’m at a wedding or funeral Mass, I am always more aware of what’s being said because I know there can be a lot of non-Catholics attending the Mass. I try to listen through their ears and wonder what they are thinking when the priest says, “Do this in memory of me – This is my Body, this is my Blood”.

We can rejoice that we are still being fed by the same Word and Eucharist that fed the Church from the very beginning. We celebrate as Jesus commanded us. If we truly believe this, Christ tells us we will have eternal life with Him.

A gentleman came up to me one time and had a serious question, “If we are working to get to heaven, then shouldn’t we want to die?” My first reaction was to say, “Well, we all want to go to heaven, but God probably has something He wants us to do while we are here on earth”. He went away thinking that was a reasonable answer.

Now, though, after reflecting on these Gospel passages of John, I want to change my answer. We may have to die to go to heaven, but we don’t have to die to taste eternal life in the Eucharist and in our relationship with Christ. Jesus provides that for us here and now if we let Him.

We can have a lot of gods in our life – obsession with money or power, prejudice, hatred, and (sometimes my favorite) holding grudges. Satan is very good at feeding us with these desires. However, they don’t satisfy our spiritual hunger.

Only the Good Shepherd has what we need to be truly satisfied. He is the Bread of Life who wants to radically change our life with His Word and with His Body and Blood.

We read that the Apostles believed and received Him by faith.

Others “murmured” and walked away. They could not listen to these “hard sayings”.

Jesus said, “The words I have spoken to you are Spirit and life”.

He gives us the same choice today – to believe or not.

To whom shall we go?


Oktoberfest 2018 is coming - Hurry! Get your tickets now »